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LOVE IS A MIXTAPE PDF

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Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time. Home · Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time Author: Rob Sheffield. downloads. "No rock critic- living or dead, American or otherwise- has ever written about pop music with the evocative, hyperpoetic perfectitude of Rob Sheffield. Love is a Mix Tape is the happiest, saddest, greatest book about rock’n’roll that I’ve ever experienced." "I can’t think. [PDF] DOWNLOAD Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time by Rob Sheffield [PDF] DOWNLOAD Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and.


Love Is A Mixtape Pdf

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Read "Love Is a Mix Tape Life, Loss, and What I Listened To" by Rob Sheffield available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your. love is a mixtape pdf. About Love Is a Mix Tape. Mix tapes: Stick one into a deck and you’re transported to another time in your life. For Rob Sheffield, author. Love Is A Mix Tape by Rob Sheffield, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

I was concerned. I was somewhat petrified. This guy was a prog rock fan. He mailed me the tape. I was living in Boston at the time, he was in the boondocks of NH. I held it. I read the songs. I put it on my desk. I went out for ice cream. Around day 3, I finally had the room to myself living in a boarding house with 40 other woman, that was a feat and carefully placed it in my boom box.

She's a lady, she is mine. Brush back your hair, and let me get to know your flesh. Anyway, this book. This could be Maurice and me. Maurice would probably know… he knew all the rock critics. But, this story… these mix tapes. They spoke to me in a completely sappy selfish way. I see a lot of Maurice in Rob. I had no idea that this was a sad love story. Knowing they have more tears in them than you will be able to keep them from crying.

Rob relates almost everything through music. The guy that always has headphones on, that totally judges you by your cd collection, that has a song for everything. Maurice was always gently forcing me to like his music. He never tired of it. I have milk crates full of Maurice creations. I can identify with these people.

I would strike back with some of my own and we would argue during long car rides what was neutral ground. ELP was out. Genesis was neutral. Poi Dog Pondering was out. The minute gestures and pop culture commentary might annoy people.

Mixtapes forevs. Opening line: I'm listening to a mix tape from I'm sure most of us over a certain age still have them safely hidden away somewhere, never quite having had the nerve to throw them out broken cases and all We named these tapes, gave them away to friends or lovers and assigned them different purposes. Remember the break-up tape, the I'm so infatuated with you t Opening line: Remember the break-up tape, the I'm so infatuated with you tape, the party tape, workout tape, road trip tape, stolen off the radio tape etc, etc.

It took hours to create a mix tape, attempting to get the songs in perfect order without cutting off the last one. Now imagine, nearly 20 years later having the courage to scour through and listen to all those tapes again. You might also experience pain or sadness over that long lost love. I absolutely adored this book. Rob Sheffield style of writing is so honest, natural and funny that you'll feel like your talking with an old friend. He manages too capture the spirit of the 90's perfectly too as he tells a moving autobiographical account of his years spent with wife Renee.

Anyone who lived through that time and is into pop culture will find something relatable here. This is also a tragic love story and on the very first page we learn that Renee has died, we just don't know how or why. We then flash back to the time to before they met as Rob experiences an awkward adolescence and discovers his love of Indie rock. One night Rob meets the sweet Southern girl of his dreams and although only 25 they soon marry. It's not a perfect marriage however; they're broke most of the time, they fight, they get a dog, they drink Zima remember Zima?

Rob and Renee ultimately get 7 years together and even though I knew that Renee was going to die when it actually happened I was left stunned. Sheffield depicts the ache of new love and utter helplessness of losing it beautifully and following Rob through the next grief stricken chapters was at times hard to take. Some of the tapes were made by Renee others by Rob but you're sure to have a lot of moments remembering your own life's soundtrack as you journey along with the music.

You might even find a couple of new favourites. Mar 12, Bryan rated it it was ok. I really wanted to like this book, despite my mild dislike for Sheffield's writing in Rolling Stone magazine. While the story is heartbreaking -- he becomes a widower earlier than anyone should be allowed to -- I was expecting much more insight than what's provided in this slim tome I read it in one sitting.

The story boils down to this -- music nerd from Boston meets awesome Appalachian girl who is everything he isn't.

Other books: LOVE MESSAGES BOOK

You know where the story is heading after he is instantly smitten when she I really wanted to like this book, despite my mild dislike for Sheffield's writing in Rolling Stone magazine. You know where the story is heading after he is instantly smitten when she is the only other person in a University of Virginia bar to recognize that Big Star's second album is playing. They make a connection and later, much to his surprise, they fall in love and get married. After his wife is tragically taken away from him he spends the final half of the book telling the reader over and over to the point of irritation how awesome his wife was.

While each chapter begins with a playlist of a mix tape he or his wife had made, Sheffield doesn't write enough about the songs on the tapes. Why did he select certain songs over others? What makes a good tape. For a man who made tapes for such mundane chores as washing the dishes and walking the dogs, it's a cop-out not to write about the music itself.

Of course, that may not be a bad thing. You would think that someone who writes for Rolling Stone would have high standards for determining what makes a good song. Not Sheffield. To him, all music is great, from the Replacements to Journey to the J.

Geils Band. Makes you wonder how he wound up writing for a national magazine. Unfortunately we never learn because Sheffield is too busy telling how awesome his wife was. I wanted at least some idea of how he climbed out of his grief to become a columnist for one of the most storied music magazines in the country.

Sheffield likes to liberally sprinkle his writing with pop culture references as a way to show cool and ironic he is, and this book is no exception. While sometimes the references make you smile, most of the time they come off like the junior high social outcast who tries to show how hip he is by making jokes about the Dukes of Hazzard or Star Trek.

Rob Sheffield only had a few years with his wife before she died suddenly, and this book is about their relationship and his own background, all through mix tapes. It is a clever framing but also full of meaning, because all of us are probably most connected to the music from our teen through college years. Some of the music was unknown to me, but a lot of it was deeply familiar - I immediately went looking to see if someone had already pulled it together in Spotify, and they had!

Another thing I Rob Sheffield only had a few years with his wife before she died suddenly, and this book is about their relationship and his own background, all through mix tapes. Impossible not to think of it while reading this. Turns out, catching up on laundry and tidying up our soon-to-be-vacated first home ate into my reading time and I wound up finishing this about an hour after hubs left for work. Luckily, this book wasn't the sob-fest I was fearing, which is a huge point for the "pro" column.

But you know what? That lost solitary reading time was put to good use. Hubs and I giggled our way through the brutal minute-long walk to the laundry room, encountered a comedy of errors while corralling our smallclothes and turned vacuuming into a contact sport. We can all agree that a personable demeanor is unusual for a rock critic and an avid connoisseur of music, right? Because you should believe everything you see on TV, I assumed he was a happy-go-lucky dude who just truly loves and is animated by music.

It is so obvious that Rob is still smitten with Renee and probably has been since their first encounter. For someone with so little relationship experience, like Rob, that kind of selflessness is nigh impossible to either understand or execute. A memoir like this should be more of a tribute and less of a fishbowl therapy session, and it should exist to deliver a message rather than parade the author's personal tragedies in morbid self-congratulation; thankfully, this one rises above the usual credibility-killing narcissistic pitfalls.

He admits to secretly loving some disco ditties as a teenager and accepts his phases of enjoying some truly craptastic tunes. One of the points that Rob subtly made was that when two people are just as sick about music as they are about each other, music gradually becomes a third entity in the relationship.

Having that life raft of shared music and, later, music he wishes he could share with Renee is what kept the intimacy of his late wife close and, as I saw it, kept Rob from totally coming unglued.

Music does emerge as the real hero and great unifier when it comes to the crux of the story, though the quiet messages of human kindness and self-discovery serve as its moral. Yes, there is some goodness in the world: It just took a world-shattering tragedy for Rob to gain some firsthand knowledge of it.

Human kindness helped him to move on while pointing out the places where some silver lining is peeking through. This is a beautiful remembrance of a well-loved someone while doubling as a love letter to the music that will always be there through the highest highs, lowest lows and every small moment or long car ride between. View all 7 comments. Apr 02, N.

Life is filled with the most beautiful moments one can imagine but these beautiful moments could also end in some of the most painful times. Although this may be a scary concept that many avoid talking about, it is this reality that will set us on our path to enjoying these precious moments to the max. In the memoir, Love is a Mix Tape by Rob Sheffield, this concept of losing love and enjoying what you have while you have it is shown through the musically bonded love of two music journalist, Rob Life is filled with the most beautiful moments one can imagine but these beautiful moments could also end in some of the most painful times.

In the memoir, Love is a Mix Tape by Rob Sheffield, this concept of losing love and enjoying what you have while you have it is shown through the musically bonded love of two music journalist, Rob and Renee.

Even though reading this memoir really had its impact on me, I don't believe this book should be mandatory for a high school readers to read, but should definitely be offered independently for its ability to grab the interest and hearts of the reader and give life to the idea of loving something as much as you can while you can. After a short five years into their lives together married, Renee suddenly passes away on Mothers Day When looking back on his life and time spent with Renee, Rob is able to use their mix tapes they have created over the years to show the love they shared.

Through songs by some of the, most famous bands who have ever lived these mixtapes show small things like their time spent cooking together in the kitchen to the time Rob spent in deep grievance, all alone after the loss of his wife. The life lesson to be taken from this beautiful memoir has little to do with any educational values but a lot to do with personal experiences.

This is specifically why I would recommend this book to be used by high schools more as an optional read because once this book is picked up it will be hard for the student to put it back down.

Also, the lesson about living and loving what you are going through and have at this moment is cherish-able and important for any age group. Although a scary thought, we may have the world today but tomorrow we might not have a single thing so take the time now to cherish and enjoy it.

View all 6 comments. Feb 13, Matt rated it it was amazing. This is the kind of memoir I'd like to have written albeit without the deceased wife. I've had a few conversations with friends in the last year or so about the long-lost art of the mix tape, which has been delivered a death-blow by the digital age.

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Burning a CD mix just isn't the same; for one, it doesn't take nearly as long to make a CD mix, which cheapens the sentiment attached to giving one to someone, especially when the hope is that the gesture and the songs themselves with make the reci This is the kind of memoir I'd like to have written albeit without the deceased wife.

Burning a CD mix just isn't the same; for one, it doesn't take nearly as long to make a CD mix, which cheapens the sentiment attached to giving one to someone, especially when the hope is that the gesture and the songs themselves with make the recipient fall instantly in love with you. And you no longer have to worry about the time remaining at the end of a cassette's side: Maybe, but only if it's a short one. So what song is both a.

And then there was the planning for the sequence of the mix's sides. You couldn't just randomly throw a bunch of songs together; you had to carefully balance both the tempo and the lyrical content of the songs. When all was said and done, the whole process took the better part of a Saturday See also, the tragic passage inspired by Sleater-Kinney's 'One More Hour', the eulogy to the '90s, and the author's recipe for the perfect party.

Love is a Mixtape Finalized.pdf - Julissa Contreras English...

All in all, a really wonderful read. Fun, poignant, relatable, adorable, so '90s, so riot grrrl, and so successful in adding a deeper, introspective, human dimension to Rob Sheffield -- the coolest, if sometimes vapid -- member of Rolling Stone's waning pool of talent.

Apr 27, lit. I didn't know what I was. I didn't have a noun. Some parts were a bit cheesy, but the mix tape chapter headers were a fun touch. I appreciate Sheffield sharing this difficult part of his life and how he coped. Jan 18, Annalisa rated it it was ok Shelves: I picked up this book because of the title. I loved the idea of the intense power of music to draw on memory and expected my own memories to mesh with the story.

But I found Sheffield's mesh of music unusual, sometimes jarring, and I found myself not connecting with it as much as I'd like. It was a bittersweet memoir with a few humorous moments, but there wasn't anything unusual or memorable in his story.

Quotable moments: But most of all, I regret turning thirteen, and staying that way for the n I picked up this book because of the title. But most of all, I regret turning thirteen, and staying that way for the next ten years or so. At any wedding we attend, my family is the problem table, the one everyone gradually drifts away from out of self-preservation. It's a proud family tradition. Now this was our wedding, and nobody could stop us.

Giving us a crate of champagne and a dance floor was like handing a madman the keys to a and saying, "Now, seriously, dude, don't crash it. Dog love is blind. For that matter, dog love is stupid. As soon as they hit the stage, you could hear all the girls in the crowd ovulate in unison. You lose a certain kind of innocence when you experience this type of kindness.

You lose your right to be a jaded cynic. I was helpless in trying to return people's kindness, but also helpless to resist it. Kindness is a scarier force than cruelty, that's for sure. Cruelty isn't that hard to understand. I had no trouble comprehending why the phone company wanted to screw me over; they just wanted to steal some money, it was nothing personal. That's the way of the world. It made me mad, but it didn't make me feel stupid. If anything, it flattered my intelligence.

Accepting all that kindness, though, made me feel stupid. The way I pictured it, all this grief would be like a winter night when you're standing outside. You'll warm up once you get used to the cold. Except after you've been out there a whole, you feel the warmth draining out of you and you realize the opposite is happening; you're getting colder and colder, as the body heat you brought outside with you seeps out of your skin.

Instead of getting used to it, you get weaker the longer you endure it. Each side of a tape goes on for forty-five minutes, and then comes to a stop, allowing a chance for somebody to discreetly change the music, whereas a mix CD has only one side. Which means it goes on for eighty minutes, and you can't turn it off halfway through without offering some sort of lame excuse, such as "Garth is singing about cocaine in this song and it's bad for the baby," or "Dave Matthews is mixing violin solos with saxophone solos and it's bad for the baby.

According to the Western philosopher Pat Benatar, love is a battlefield. Her paisan Frank Sinatra would add the corollary that love is a tender trap Love hurts.

Love stinks. Love bites, love bleeds, love is a drug. The troubadours of our times all agree: They want to know what love is, and they want you to show them. But the answer is simple: Love is a mix tape. Jul 16, jess rated it liked it Shelves: This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Jun 01, Shawn Sorensen rated it liked it Shelves: Now I know someone likes making mix tapes and by extension mix cds as much as I do.

I also know someone's as crazy about the corniness and desperation of 90s music as I am about 80s music. When I embrace some of mainstream music's most desperate attempts to throw something profound into our pop culture - take Celine Dion's "My Heart Will Go On" or Spandeau Ballet's "True" - I know author Rob Sheffield will join me in my heartfelt applause.

And, like Sheffield, I think my generation of music - Now I know someone likes making mix tapes and by extension mix cds as much as I do. And, like Sheffield, I think my generation of music - the color and creativity, the upbeat rhythms, the high-road empathy, THE FUN - is better than any other generation, especially the whiny-ness and muffled emptiness of a lot of 90s fare. We all knew life sucked.

That's why we spent so much time walking like Egyptians. The writing here is open, conversational, too-the-point and surprisingly funny.

Sheffield doesn't let us get to know his wife, Renee, too well, as if he needs to keep a lot of the details to himself. Fair enough.

Love Is A Mix Tape : A Memoir

His enthusiasm for music is not quite as limited: No matter who she is, or how we meet, the synth-pop duo fantasy has to work, or the crush fizzles out. I have loads of other musical fantasies about my crushes--I picture us as a Gram-and-Emmylou country harmony duo, or as guitarists in a rock band, trading off vocals like Mick and Keith. But for me, it always comes back to the synth-pop duo. The girl is up front, swishing her skirt, tossing her hair, a saucy little firecracker.

I'm the boy in the back, hidden behind my Roland JP keyboard. On the other hand, Renee is a lighter, funnier person, someone who frequently celebrates life or makes those around her feel more comfortable.

In the end, I think of this as a brave book. Brave in how Sheffield remembers Renee, brave for being so unabashedly enthusiastic about the music we hear on our radios.

I didn't know most of the songs, and I want a more detailed, chronological description of their relationship. In short, I wanted to get into this book more. The author had me at "Hello". Jun 16, Stephanie rated it really liked it Shelves: There are millions of songs in the world, and millions of ways to connect them into mixes. A mix tape steals these moments from all over the musical cosmos, and splices them into a whole new grove.

Apr 10, Lavinia rated it really liked it Shelves: I'm so excited about discovering Rob Sheffield, I can't even begin to tell you. For the first time in years, I didn't find about the book on websites, blogs, magazines or friend recommendations, I just stumbled upon it and decided I wanted to read it.

I never made a mix tape. Because I was never into making them, you know, t I'm so excited about discovering Rob Sheffield, I can't even begin to tell you. Because I was never into making them, you know, the time and effort put into selecting the songs, plus I don't think I owned enough music to do that, or the equipment.

But I had mix tapes made for me, and I still remember songs from those cassettes, and later I had mix CDs made for me, and I might still have some CDs my husband made for me years ago, when he wasn't even my boyfriend and I listened to them and tried to figure out how he was like and the whatnot.

Stalk much? I just needed him to know that I do remember KLF's Justified and Ancient, because in the 9th grade one of my colleagues was obsessed with it. So yeah, I'm listening to JT's album as I write, because music and musicians are so versatile and our tastes change and evolve in years, since I know for sure there are bands or singers I wouldn't have listened to in my teens that I just love now.

Like Prince or some of the '90s bands I found so annoying at the time. That's it. I need to do the dishes. If you liked High Fidelity or Just Kids , you're probably going to enjoy this as well.

May 05, Malbadeen rated it liked it Recommends it for: If you've lost someone that you cared deeply for you know the frustration in not being able to express who that person was to others.

The on going loss that comes from meeting new people and knowing they will never know this person this HUGE part of your life can seem crippling at times. In some ways this book appears to be Sheffields attempt to make his wife known to us after her very early death. Personally, I don't think he succeeded. His short lived marriage to her seemed sweet in a teen a If you've lost someone that you cared deeply for you know the frustration in not being able to express who that person was to others.

His short lived marriage to her seemed sweet in a teen angel kind of way but the essence of who she was or the connection didn't feel more unique than any number of early crushes, relationships people experience. The fact that they married early and only had 5 years together as a husband and wife together before seemed glaringly obvious in his idolized, frequently cliche ramblings of her. His writing about the music itself outweighed his attention to the point he had initially started with and there were at least 2 chapters that seemed entirely unnecessary, if not distracting.

Frequently his writing appeared to be designed more for a beer commercial than a book, when speaking to his affinity for mixed tapes he says, " The times you lived through, the people you shared those times with - nothing brings it all to life like an old mix tape". It's hard for me to read that sentence, however true it may be, without imagining a swimming pool, coolers of beer and bikini clad woman.

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And yet! Three stars because I loved the chapter when he reminisced his pubescent attempts at making mixed tapes for parties! I loved his reflections on what music meant to girls vs. I admit, I'm quintessentially a 90's kid.

I love everything about this decade- be it the irrational exuberance, Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network, The Lion King, My So-Called Life, listening to music on cassette tapes, the music itself, growing up without Facebook or the internet etcetera etcetera. And let's not forget Grunge. Screaming guitars, screechy angsty vocals, flannel shirts, greasy hair sans the hair products, flipping the bird to stupid societal conformations And I love making playlists.

Why did I love this book so much? WHAT I mean is that at some basic level, this book really touched me. Maybe because that's how I imagine my life to be six years from now minus a dead spouse. You know, fresh out of college, not having a high flying executive job, bumming around, living impulsively, eating and breathing music. And books. I want to be wasted.

Not on drugs but on the joy living life exactly the way you want brings. I can relate so much to Rob and his wife Renee that it almost borders on creepy. She expected the world not to cheat her and was always surprised when it did. She had more ideas than she had time to finish. She worried a lot about whether she was good enough. And poured salt on them. I liked that all the chapters started with a mix tape featuring some of my favorite artists, I might add.

So it was a happy feeling to know that songs that affect me affect other people in a similar way.

And the moment when you go Ohmysweetgoodness how did I possibly live so much of my life without that song? It's insanely intoxicating- like, finding some lost piece of you that you didn't even know was missing.

And awww they named their dog Duane Allman. How cute. No it's tacky. Cuz it's a she. But superficiality has been good to me. Every time I have a crush on a boy, I have the same fantasy aside from the one about making out in the library - I imagine the two of us doing a kickass rock duet preferably Drain You but I'm always open to suggestions.

So why the four stars you ask? Because I'm bitter. This book hit too close to home that for a moment I lost the ability to breathe and I was sitting stumped. Yeah I'm a professional at nursing a grudge. Aug 01, Suzanne rated it really liked it Shelves: Sheffield is a writer for Rolling Stone Magazine, with a long career in reviewing pop culture and music. Love is a Mix Tape is a beautiful memoir about the romance and untimely death of his wife Renee.

I really enjoyed this sweet little book. It already had two things going for it when I started reading: He's right that music becomes a memory - and I really enjo Sheffield is a writer for Rolling Stone Magazine, with a long career in reviewing pop culture and music. He's right that music becomes a memory - and I really enjoyed getting to know Rob, Renee and their relationship through his listing of various "mix tapes" they made during the years covered in the memoir. I even found myself going to Amazon Music and searching for the songs I was unfamiliar with - since it was obvious Rob and Renee had great taste in music.

It's funny. When my late husband and I were dating, I introduced the idea of the mix tape to him. I made him a tape that reminded me of us, and the happiness and excitement of our relationship.

He had never heard of doing such a thing, but quickly embraced it, in turn, sending me mix tapes. We lived in two different countries, so between times being together, we sent each other tapes.

I had no idea other couples did the mix tape thing as well. I can't help but feel an affinity to Rob and Renee. Had we run in the same circles, we would have probably been friends. Rob's writing about the sense of loss of self you feel when a spouse dies was very real.

I totally understood his initial paralysis, his desire to talk about Renee and his struggle to get through those difficult years. What made this book so special to me, was that it was a tribute to Renee. The mix tape metaphor, and expressing the essence of this woman and their love through music, is a beautiful way for people to remember her. Mar 18, Stacey rated it really liked it. I've wanted to read this book ever since I learned of it's existence way back in senior year of high school.

It's been some years, but I'm glad I got around to it. It's definitely a book for a music lover; give me a band or a genre and I can tell you whatever you'd like. I wanted to read two music books back to back, some might think what an odd choice because Dawes book is about social issues regarding race and I've wanted to read this book ever since I learned of it's existence way back in senior year of high school.

What both books share is how music is used as a tool for coping, coping with loneliness, coping with loss, coping with awkwardness and coping with life. Sheffield has a song for every moment, for school dances, for breaking up, for making out, for driving down state highways and for losing Renee.

He loved Renee like he loved his mixtapes; he made her tapes, she made him tapes. His tapes become a tribute, memory and song for her life.

Feb 11, Doroti rated it liked it. Nov 18, Lisastrawberry rated it it was amazing. I love Rob Sheffield's writing. This one is tough, since it's so hard to think about what you would do if the one you love most died suddenly. Rob handles this incredibly painful subject honestly, with depth, humor and of course music geekery. Love is indeed a mix tape.

Readers Also Enjoyed. Biography Memoir. About Rob Sheffield. Rob Sheffield. Rob Sheffield is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine. In addition to writing music reviews and profile stories, Sheffield also writes the Pop Life column in the Mixed Media section of the magazine.

His work has also been featured in The Village Voice and Spin. His first book, Love is a Mix Tape: It received starred reviews in Publisher's Weekly and Library Journal.Gabrielle Zevin. Jodi Picoult. Knowing they have more tears in them than you will be able to keep them from crying. He manages too capture the spirit of the 90's perfectly too as he tells a moving autobiographical account of his years spent with wife Renee.

But most of all, I regret turning thirteen, and staying that way for the n I picked up this book because of the title. Because our lives are basically a mix tape of everything we think and live and love and do.

I can relate so much to Rob and his wife Renee that it almost borders on creepy. Rob was from the city.

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