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BERMUDA TRIANGLE BOOK

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The Bermuda Triangle is a best-selling book by Charles Berlitz which popularized the belief of the Bermuda Triangle as an area of ocean prone to. The Bermuda Triangle book. Read 93 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. You may have heard of it as 'the Hoodoo Sea', 'the Graveyard o. Book is in great condition, especially for it's age. My Grandmother had this book and I wanted to read them again. Now that I am older I appreciate these.


Bermuda Triangle Book

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Into the Bermuda Triangle: Pursuing the Truth Behind the World's Greatest Mystery Into the Bermuda Triangle and millions of other books are available for . This book presents the eerie accidents and unexplained disappearances that have occurred in the region known as the Bermuda Triangle. Find Bermuda Triangle books online. Get the best Bermuda Triangle books at our marketplace.

He believed not only that Atlantis was real, but also that it was connected to the triangle in some way, a theory he proposed in his bestselling book "The Bermuda Triangle. Over the years, many theories have been offered to explain the mystery. Some writers have expanded upon Berlitz's ideas about Atlantis , suggesting that the mythical city may lie at the bottom of the sea and be using its reputed "crystal energies" to sink ships and planes.

Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle

Other more fanciful suggestions include time portals why a rift in the space-time fabric of the universe would open up in this particular patch of well-traveled ocean is never explained and extraterrestrials — including rumors of underwater alien bases. Still others believe that the explanation lies in some sort of extremely rare and little—known — yet perfectly natural — geological or hydrological explanation.

For example, perhaps ships and planes are destroyed by pockets of flammable methane gas known to exist in large quantities under the sea — maybe lightning or an electrical spark ignited a huge bubble of methane that came to the surface right next to a ship or plane, causing them to sink without a trace. There are a few obvious logical problems with this theory, including that methane exists naturally around the world and such an incident has never been known to happen.

Others suggest sudden rogue tidal waves. Or maybe some mysterious geomagnetic anomaly that creates navigational problems confusing pilots and somehow causing them to plunge into the ocean; then again, pilots are trained to fly even with a loss of electronic navigation, and that theory doesn't explain ship disappearances.

In fact, the Navy has a web page debunking this idea: "It has been inaccurately claimed that the Bermuda Triangle is one of the two places on earth at which a magnetic compass points towards true north. Normally a compass will point toward magnetic north. The difference between the two is known as compass variation. Although in the past this compass variation did affect the Bermuda Triangle region, due to fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic field this has apparently not been the case since the nineteenth century.

A journalist named Larry Kusche asked exactly that question, and came to a surprising answer: there is no mystery about strange disappearances in the Bermuda Triangle.

Kusche exhaustively re-examined the "mysterious disappearances" and found that the story was basically created by mistakes, mystery mongering, and in some cases outright fabrication — all being passed along as fact-checked truth. In his definitive book "The Bermuda Triangle Mystery — Solved," Kusche notes that few writers on the topic bothered to do any real investigation — they mostly collected and repeated other, earlier writers who did the same.

Alternative facts, from before the time of social media. This book in itself isn't badly written, and if one feels generous, one may assume that the writer actually believed what he wrote. And it might be added, that it unfair to use modern scientific knowledge on a book more than 40 years old. Still this book suffers from cherrypicking of facts and some of the statements "cryogenics will soon give us the opportunity to preserve life indefinately" have been proven patently false.

However, it is Alternative facts, from before the time of social media. However, it is enjoyable to read about the conjenctures of the early tinfoilhat people Not a bad read. You need to take into consideration that it was released in The version I read was printed in , the version pictured here is from Of course technologies have changed dramatically.

And even though the latter part of the book fades off the subject, it does discuss some very interesting phenomenons of history. Like the giant carvings in Peru that can only be viewed in their entirety from up in Not a bad read.

Like the giant carvings in Peru that can only be viewed in their entirety from up in a plane. How where they made by ancient man with primitive tools and no aircraft? That sort of thing. Yes, some of the info is outdated due to the book being 40 years old, but if you go into it with that in mind, it's kinda cool to read some of the theories and beliefs people came up with at that particular time in history.

Not a great, grab ya' and keep you up all night kinda read, but has some very interesting parts and overall not a bad book. Apr 01, Emily rated it did not like it. Although most of the sensational "mysteries" and disappearances of ships and airplanes in the "Bermuda Triangle" have since been proven to be the result of either human error or ordinary bad weather, this is still an entertaining read. For a while. After running to the computer every few pages to check on recent developments in the searches for these crafts and finding out that either wreckage has been found, or that recordings of distress signals have been digitally enhanced and turned out to b Although most of the sensational "mysteries" and disappearances of ships and airplanes in the "Bermuda Triangle" have since been proven to be the result of either human error or ordinary bad weather, this is still an entertaining read.

After running to the computer every few pages to check on recent developments in the searches for these crafts and finding out that either wreckage has been found, or that recordings of distress signals have been digitally enhanced and turned out to be far less ominous than reported, I got more and more disenchanted. That this book is frequently listed as non-fiction is unfortunate.

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Nevertheless, Berlitz is a compelling writer, and it's not difficult to read. I'm sure if you like this genre and aren't terribly distracted by "facts" you may enjoy this book.

Mistery is always atractive, and this topic, The Bermuda Triangle was one that always caught my eye. Of course, being an old book, the theories that it gives about the mysterious dissapearance of planes and boats of differents sizes and origins, are also old.

Anyway this was good for a fast reading, just to learn more about an old topic from human general culture. Oct 08, Ali moharamkhani rated it really liked it. An engaging account of the unexplained mystery of the triangle. More here: Sep 26, Ahmed rated it really liked it. Libro con un po'di anni sulle Affascinanti invece le varie teorie sulla sparizione di navi, aerei ed equipaggi, anche se talvolta con ripetizioni estenuanti.

Io sono del parere che la conoscenza non sia un grande fossile acquisito una volta per tutte. Sempre affascinanti la criptoscienza e la criptostoria It starts off as a well-documented account of the eerie disappearances of ships and airplanes in the Bermuda triangle, told a bit like spooky bedtime stories.

Then it's attempting to explain it sort of scientifically. An then it turns into the silliest thing ever. I'm not saying that there are no extraterrestrial life or anything.

There probably is and it's probably another life form entirely, like a unicellular thingy or bacteria. And I suppose it's the same with life forms at the bottom of the It starts off as a well-documented account of the eerie disappearances of ships and airplanes in the Bermuda triangle, told a bit like spooky bedtime stories.

The Myth Doesn't Hold Up

And I suppose it's the same with life forms at the bottom of the ocean. There probably are creatures we still don't know anything about.

But why on earth would they want to watch us or abduct us??!! Come on, that's our ego talking. Also I'm not saying that ancient civilizations hadn't knowledge that we lost along the way but that they had planes and electricity and atomic bombs It doesn't make any sense. I'm not buying it, sorry.

The book is a bit old now and I would be really interested in researches that might have been made more recently about the bermuda triangle and whether there still are strange phenomena.

Aug 08, Annick rated it it was ok Shelves: Das erste Buch dieser Art, das ich je las. Aug 11, Roberto Audiffred rated it liked it.

It's an entertaining book although not great. The first part is a bit boring since it consists of a catalog of unexplained incidents, one after the other, for a hundred pages.

It really isn't that convincing that some big mystery takes place in the Bermuda Triangle and its connection to UFOs and things like that seems tenuous at best. However, the book really gets going and becomes interesting when Berlitz focuses on the possible existence of ancient prehistoric civilizations, like Atlantis and It's an entertaining book although not great.

However, the book really gets going and becomes interesting when Berlitz focuses on the possible existence of ancient prehistoric civilizations, like Atlantis and such. The connection of this to the main mystery of the book is also very tenuous but this part about ancient civilizations is the one that is actually convincing. He goes off on a tangent recounting old, unexplained mysteries of ancient India and stuff but that is where the book gets good. It made me want to read his other books on that subject.

This book oozes with syphilitic rot.

Bermuda Triangle: Where Facts Disappear

What makes this book so nasty is not that it is probably all bullshit, but that it is horribly written. One cannot be made to believe in marvels, like the Bermuda Triangle, if the only marvel they are confronted with is the mystery of how this book was ever published.

I read this book many moons ago in high school. Loved it. Many say the theories in it have long since been debunked They always say this to discredit the Truth. Other writers after Berlitz say the same things on the Triangle. Jun 19, Kent rated it really liked it. Really, really weird. Remember how strange it was when that Malaysian flight disappeared?

Now imagine smaller vessels of water and air disappearing at a rate of one per month for 30 years! I'd love for a current researcher to look into this phenomenon from the current state of affairs. Oct 20, Laura Dam rated it liked it.

You might also like: INTO THE BERMUDA TRIANGLE PDF

Muy entretenido, era uno de mis favoritos en la infancia. Many of the theories postulated in this famous release have been debunked. Still, the Bermuda Triangle mystery reminds us that there is still much to be learnt about mankind's history along with the Earth's natural history.

Outdated but still a fun read! Apr 24, Russ Holm rated it liked it. Interesting, but dated. Dec 02, Chad Sr rated it it was amazing. Good data to know for future scientists. Nonostante sia un saggio piuttosto datato, risulta comunque interessante.

I can't give this the one-star it deserves, despite it being throughly saturated with stupid. It's actually a great illustration of the kind of crap that 20 million bought into, and are still buying into today think Fox"News", Breitbart, Alex Jones, and even more from an unfortunately lengthy list Why read it now?

Well, not all of my Year of Nostalgic Re-reads are fiction. I read this back in or 75, which put me at 13 or I was intrigued, at the time. Of course, while on the path o I can't give this the one-star it deserves, despite it being throughly saturated with stupid. Of course, while on the path of future skepticism, I had less than no resources in south-eastern Connecticut to check anything, so just read it out of curiosity and while with a critical eye, no means to counter.

Now, 40 years later, and with access to lots of resources via the internet, Berlitz's embellishments, fabrications, outright lies, distortions and tabloid imflammatory style are so easily debunked. And yet, this book is still shoved incorrectly in the nonfiction section.

First example: This is the style throughout: Large aircraft which have also disappeared since the Star Ariel have generally followed the same pattern - that is, normal flight procedures, then - nothing [ Of the bioluminescence of the Sargasso Sea: Easy to dismiss but all part of the catastrophe that is Berlitz. The first paragraph of Chapter 5 shares this gem: Sure, but that's because on every page there are so many unverifiable claims that stupid stuff like that stands out.

Or page Normally, it points to magnetic north. The truth is there are an infinite number of places along the agonic line. A magnetic compass still points to magnetic north Hokum likely intended to distract from the shoddy sensationalist writing.

Burger and Simpson had fun with that in their book Ghostboat. And because these "give considerable evidence of magnetic space-time anomalies", nut cases perpetuate Berlitz's crap. And it continues But I'm unfair.

This is too easy. I've read enough Martin Gardner and James Randi since I first read this, and I've engaged in enough debunking and red herring debates to know that trying to pick apart everything on every page would result in half a Wikipedia of debunkery. I didn't NOT like it I do like it to give amateur skeptics for a challenge. Lots easier nowadays!Navy Top 10 Bermuda Triangle Theories: Apr 24, Russ Holm rated it liked it. One of those theories states that the Bermuda Triangle was actually a by-product of the destruction of Atlantis.

Of course technologies have changed dramatically. View 2 comments.

How where they made by ancient man with primitive tools and no aircraft? One such writer was the man who might be considered the father of the legend, Charles Berlitz, who wrote The Bermuda Triangle in

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